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Annotations: C-D

Callahan, Kevin J. “General Education Assessment and Fulfilling the Mercy Mission at the University of St. Joseph.” Journal of Catholic Higher Education 33, no. 1 (Winter 2014): 47–62. http://www.jche.journals.villanova.edu/index.

Acknowledging the emphasis and importance of assessment in contemporary higher education, this author describes, with considerable data and detail, the University of St. Joseph’s “efforts to develop a systematic framework for assessing its general education program through the lens of its Mercy mission.” (47)  Four general education courses – religious studies; philosophy; women, culture, and society; and values/ethics – are assessed in terms of demonstrated student performance on specific learning outcomes related to each course.  The rigor of the assessment process as well as subsequent faculty development opportunities and/or curricular revisions addressed the University’s commitment to its Mercy mission understood as “developing the potential of women….growth of the whole person…strong ethical values, personal integrity and a sense of responsibility to the needs of society.” (48)

Application:  Because of its transparency and specificity regarding aims, processes, methods, and outcomes, this article could both motivate and guide other Mercy institutions seeking to identify, address, and assess the curricular embodiments of their Mercy-inspired educational mission.  Further enriching this article are its citations of recognized higher education assessment principles and tools, its recognition that specific courses can be overwhelmed by too many learning objectives, and its discussion of the value of this assessment to the general education program, program faculty and the assessors themselves.

 


Carlow Roundtable 2007 Proceedings. Pittsburgh, PA: The Carlow University Press, 2007. http://www.carlow.edu/carlow_roundtable_proceedings.aspx.

Begun in 2007 as an opportunity for “collegial exchange” among educators at Mercy-sponsored colleges and universities, the Carlow Roundtables started as annual events and are now held every two years.  With significant leadership from Sister Sheila Carney, R.S.M., the Roundtable is sponsored by Carlow University (Pittsburgh), but is held in Ireland, the birthplace of the Sisters of Mercy.

In its inaugural year, the Carlow Roundtable invoked an image from Catherine McAuley of water flowing into the sea “without losing any of the sweetness” of fresh water.  That image led to presentations in which water symbolized various aspects of education – nourishment and reflection, agility and change, service and the importance of bridge-building. 

While annotations of the individual presentations preserved in the annual Proceedings are not yet included in the CMHE Annotated Bibliography, the list of titles and authors below testifies to the rich material available from this source. 

Acklie, Deanna. “LIFE: Literacy Influences Future Experiences.” 99-107.

Dolphin, Brenda, R.S.M. “The Life and Vision of Catherine McAuley.” 7-12.

Eberle, Christine, and Betsy Stone Plummer. “Mercy Works: Building Bridges One
     Heart at a Time.” 96-98.

Eveleth, Lois. “Salve Regina University: A Legacy of Mercy.” 40-53.

Ezzell, Martha Howland. “A Study of Worldview: Mission, Catholic Identity, and
     Academic Freedom in Colleges and Universities Sponsored by the Sisters of
     Mercy of the Americas.” 58-69.

Gabrich, Chrys. “Service Learning: the Power of University-Community
     Connections.” 91-95.

Herrmann, Mary L. “The Mercy Mission Reflected in Our Pedagogy and Curriculum
     Mercy and Justice: The Humanities.” 13-16.

Lucas-Darby, Emma T. “Connecting to the Community at Its Doors: The Mercy
     Neighborhood Ministries.” 83-90.

McCadden, Brian M. “Render unto Caesar: Maintaining Mercy Values amid the
     Pressures to Conform to State and National Teacher Education Regulations.”
     17-27.

Mikulich, Alex. “Toward the Transformative Wisdom of Mercy: Living in-between
     the Gift of Mercy and the Task of Protesting White Privilege.” 34-39.

Misto, Leona, R.S.M. “Salve Regina University: Charting Its Course by Mission
     Integration and Planning.” 28-33.

Montminy-Danna, Mary. “Changing Structures…Learning Through Doing.” 70-74.

Onufer, Mary. “Caught in the Current of the Technology Tidal Wave.” 54-57.

Sheridan, Daniel P. “To Do the Work of God: Catholic Colleges in the Mercy
     Tradition.” 75-82.



Carlow Roundtable 2008 Proceedings. Pittsburgh, PA: The Carlow University Press, 2008. http://www.carlow.edu/carlow_roundtable_proceedings.aspx.

Begun in 2007 as an opportunity for “collegial exchange” among educators at Mercy-sponsored colleges and universities, the Carlow Round Tables started as annual events and are now held every two years.  With significant leadership from Sister Sheila Carney, R.S.M., the Round Table is sponsored by Carlow University (Pittsburgh), but is held in Ireland, the birthplace of the Sisters of Mercy.

In 2008, Round Table participants “addressed the question: ‘How does our pedagogy reflect the hallmarks of Mercy Education?’” (3, emphasis in original)  The “hallmarks” were those qualities identified in a White Paper published by the Conference for Mercy Higher Education: human dignity, academic excellence, holistic education, and promotion of mercy and justice (cf. Stevens, “Mercy Higher Education: Culture and Characteristics” in this bibliography). 

While annotations of the individual presentations preserved in the annual 2008 Proceedings are not yet included in the CMHE Annotated Bibliography, the list of titles and authors below testifies to the rich material available from this source. 

Dehouske, Ellen J., and Dee Griffin Flaherty. “Sharing Your Voice: Building
     Community through the Use of Self-Disclosure in the Feminist Classroom.” 62-69.

Ezzell, Martha H. “Fashioning Voice/s: Dialogue, Reflexivity, and Disorienting
     Dilemma.” 55-61.

Gilmore, Thomas. “A Signature of a Mercy Education: The New Gen Ed Curriculum
     at Gwynedd-Mercy College.” 31-39.

Hardy, Constance J. “Reflecting the Hallmarks of Mercy Education through a
     Structured Mentoring Program.” 40-43.

Klick, Pamela. “Implementation of Mission and Core Values into Clinical Teaching.”
     44-54.

Lee, E. Suzanne, and Pamela Klick. “Assessing Catholic Identity and Mercy Heritage
     at a Mercy Institution.” 6-14.

Shorall, Christina. “Hill Street Blues: Are You Serving Your Underserved
     Population?.” 15-26.

Zajic, Kathleen.  “Demonstrating the Mercy Mission and Applying Service Learning
     through a Community-Academic Partnership.” 27-30.

 


Carlow Roundtable 2009 Proceedings. Pittsburgh, PA: The Carlow University Press, 2009. http://www.carlow.edu/carlow_roundtable_proceedings.aspx.

Begun in 2007 as an opportunity for “collegial exchange” among educators at Mercy-sponsored colleges and universities, the Carlow Round Tables started as annual events and are now held every two years.  With significant leadership from Sister Sheila Carney, R.S.M., the Round Table is sponsored by Carlow University (Pittsburgh), but is held in Ireland, the birthplace of the Sisters of Mercy.

In 2009, Round Table participants took up the theme of teaching at Mercy-inspired institutions:  How did/does the Mercy heritage influence “how and what we teach in these institutions of higher learning”? (3) How does such teaching draw on and contribute to human wisdom?

While annotations of the individual presentations preserved in the annual 2009 Proceedings are not yet included in the CMHE Annotated Bibliography, the list of titles and authors below testifies to the rich material available from this source. 

Breslin, Carol, and Edward J. Miller. “Discovering the Wells of Mercy in ‘Medieval
     Life and Thought,’ an Honors Course at Gwynedd-Mercy College.” 10-20.

Bowers, Kristi.  “Student Engagement in the Mathematics Classroom: Using the
     Language of Mathematics as a Tool for Teaching and Learning.” 21-24.

Eveleth, Lois. “Ethics across the Curriculum, on Being Bilingual.” 6-9.

Haas, Kristin. “Occupational Therapy, Service-Learning, and the Mercy Mission.”
     30-34.

Shorall, Christina. “Creating and Maintaining Enthusiasm: The Professors’ Guide to
     Building a Community of Learners through Multifaceted Lessons.” 25-29.

 


Carlow Roundtable 2011 Proceedings. Pittsburgh, PA: The Carlow University Press, 2011. http://www.carlow.edu/carlow_roundtable_proceedings.aspx.

Begun in 2007 as an opportunity for “collegial exchange” among educators at Mercy-sponsored colleges and universities, the Carlow Round Tables started as annual events and are now held every two years.  With significant leadership from Sister Sheila Carney, R.S.M., the Round Table is sponsored by Carlow University (Pittsburgh), but is held in Ireland, the birthplace of the Sisters of Mercy.

Because of the change from an annual schedule, there was no Round Table in 2010. In 2011, then, Round Table participants focused on academics and service learning, exploring the how and why of connecting teaching and scholarship with service and civic engagement.  The fundamental question:  How does mission live in the academic center of Mercy institutions of higher learning?

While annotations of the individual presentations preserved in the annual 2011 Proceedings are not yet included in the CMHE Annotated Bibliography, the list of titles and authors below testifies to the rich material available from this source. 

Anderson, Merrilee G. “Service Learning in the Sciences: Mercy Values and Civic
     Engagement.” 12-17.

Mingyar, Christopher.  “SIFE as an Effective Tool for Engaging Students in the Work
     of Empowerment.” 18-25.

Molyneaux, Donna.  “Assisting Students to Incorporate the Value of Service through
     Curricular and Co-curricular Activities.” 26-30.

Schifino, Linda. “For a Just and Merciful World: Bringing Mercy to Light in the
     Teaching of Social Movements.” 31-37.

Schulz, Merryellen Towey. “Operation S.M.A.R.T.™ Teaching Preservice Teachers:
     The Mercy Way.” 38-46.

Smid, Mary Kay. “Self-Efficacy Builds Professional Confidence in the Community
     Classroom.” 47-52.

Snyder, Mary Hembrow. “Midwifing Global Citizens: A Call to Transformation.”
     53-59.

Sproles, Karyn. “The Next Great Need: Curriculum as Mission.” 5-11.

 


Carney, Sheila, R.S.M. “The Conference for Mercy Higher Education: One Congregation's Choice for Preserving Its Charism.” Journal of Catholic Higher Education 29, no. 1 (2010): 101–112. http://www.jche.journals.villanova.edu/index.

This article traces the history of Sister of Mercy sponsorship of institutions of higher education in the context of the congregation’s organizational history.  After focusing briefly on the years 1991-2001, the article describes the formation, configuration, and purposes of the Conference for Mercy Higher Education (CMHE). Envisioned as a means of preserving and enlivening the Mercy charism at the institutions involved, CMHE was designed as the agent through which the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas would continue to sponsor their 16 colleges and universities in the United States.  The shift of sponsorship to CMHE from the several regional Mercy communities that had founded each college and university presented new possibilities but also incurred some losses, and the article touches on both aspects of this change.

Application:  This article holds historical interest, reviewing the reasons for, process of, and goals attached to creating the Conference for Mercy Higher Education.  Since the article appeared, however, CMHE has evolved further.  Most notably, the two-tiered structure of a Canonical Sponsors Council and a CMHE Board has been collapsed into one governing group.  CMHE has also enhanced the involvement of college and university presidents and has adopted a new strategic plan (2015).



Clough, Joy, R.S.M., and Susan Sanders, R.S.M. “Service Learning in a Catholic and Mercy Context.” The MAST Journal 18, no. 2 (2008): 20–26.

This article discusses how the pedagogy of service learning “is, or should be, distinctive for Catholic – and Mercy-sponsored – institutions of higher learning.” (20)  The authors consider three aspects of service learning – rationale, components, and outcomes – first in higher education generally, then at Catholic institutions of higher learning, and finally at Mercy colleges and universities.  Their argument is that each of these contexts – Catholic and Mercy – offers additional dimensions and resources for effective service learning experiences.  While welcoming the insights that other faith traditions can bring to service learning opportunities for the religiously diverse students enrolled at Mercy-sponsored institutions, the authors nonetheless propose that such institutions are privileged to be able to draw on specifically Catholic and Mercy sources such as Catholic social teaching, the tradition of the spiritual and corporal works of mercy, processes of theological reflection, the Critical Concerns of the Sisters of Mercy, and even placements at Sister of Mercy service sites.

Application:  Faculty and staff engaged in service learning or community based learning may find this article helpful on the particular question it addresses – namely, how might this pedagogy be distinctly influenced or shaped by an institution’s Catholic identity and Mercy heritage.  In other words, what “value-added” does being Catholic and Mercy bring to service learning?   

NOTE:  Until The MAST Journal is available on-line, individual copies of an article can be requested from the Mercy Heritage Center.  Contact the archivist Grant Gerlich at ggerlich@sistersofmercy.org.

 


Conference for Mercy Higher Education. “Sponsorship: Board Talking Points” (2007). http://www.mercyhighered.org/identity.html.

Though outdated in part, this brief document offers clear definitions and explanations of sponsorship and Mercy-Catholic identity for Mercy institutions of higher education.  It also introduces and provides a bit of history about the Conference for Mercy Higher Education (CMHE), the entity through with the Sisters of Mercy sponsor Mercy colleges and universities.  The outdated portions of this document are two sections entitled “Responsibilities of the CMHE Board” and “Responsibilities of the Canonical Sponsor Council.”  While most of the identified responsibilities remain, the structure of CMHE has changed.  (See the CMHE website, www.mercyhighered.org, for current structural and other information.) 

Application:  This document could well be part of every trustee orientation program at Mercy-sponsored colleges and universities.  From day one, presidents and other administrators at those institutions should also be familiar with the content of this document.  Ideally, CMHE will update the responsibility sections to conform to its new structure.  Even as is, however, this document offers the value of being a quick read with solid and essential governance information.

 


Conference for Mercy Higher Education. “Catholic Identity in Mercy: Core Statements about the Identity and Purposes of Institutions of Higher Education Sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy” (1993; 2010). http://www.mercyhighered.org/identity.html.

This document, found on the CMHE website, consists of two statements:

  1. “Statement on Mercy Higher Education” issued by the Sisters of Mercy Institute Leadership Conference in 1993, and
  2. “Our Catholic Identity and Mercy Charism” statement issued by the CMHE Board and approved by the CMHE Canonical Sponsor Council in 2010.

These are brief but authoritative statements for the institutions of higher education sponsored by the Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas through the Conference for Mercy Higher Education.  In tandem, they voice the Sisters of Mercy’s reasons for engaging in the ministry of higher education, their expectations of a Mercy institution, and their hopes for such institutions’ impact on students. 

Application:  These statements might well be incorporated into the orientation of Board members, administrators, faculty members, and staff members as they take up responsibilities at a Mercy-sponsored college or university.  In concert with an institution’s mission statement, these statements could serve as touchstones for major decisions and for assessment processes in all aspects of university life.



Conference for Mercy Higher Education. Life within the Stream of Mercy: Mission Development for Administration and Faculty. With the assistance of Jayme Hennessy, Helen Marie Burns, R.S.M., Leona Misto, R.S.M., Susan Sanders, R.S.M., Moya Dittmeier, and Martin Larrey. Privately published, n.d. [2009?].

This booklet captures the work of several scholars - Sisters of Mercy and laypersons – working with mission integration programs at Mercy-sponsored colleges and universities.  It offers

  1. introductory notes on “the nature and activity of mercy” as one instance of Ex corde Ecclesiae’s call for Catholic universities to further “the development of a true Christian anthropology” (7);
  2. a paper entitled “’I Desire Mercy’: The Theological Foundations for Examining the Role of Mercy in Higher Education” by Dr. Jayme Hennessy;
  3. brief responses to four frequently asked questions about mission development programs;
  4. a sequenced overview of purposes, components, and resources for a mission development program; and
  5. two sample programs from the 2008-2009 academic year – one from Saint Xavier University (Chicago) and another from Salve Regina University (Newport, RI).

Application:  Administrators and mission personnel at Mercy-sponsored colleges and universities will find this booklet a helpful resource for efforts to introduce faculty and staff – and perhaps trustees and students – to the Catholic and Mercy character of their institutions.   Reflections on education’s role to develop students who will “live responsibly in the world”(7) and on mercy understood as “the restoration of human dignity” (17) are complemented by the examples of actual programs that introduce and relate topics such as Catholic social teaching or the Sisters of Mercy Critical Concerns to the academic life of teaching, scholarship, and service.  

NOTE:  Dr. Hennessy’s article cited above is separately reviewed in this Mercy Higher Education Annotated Bibliography.

 


Crossen, Maureen, R.S.M. “Stepping Up to Catherine McAuley's Dance Called 'Right and Left' - Higher Education and Service-Learning, Mercy Style.” Watchung, NY, August 2003. http://www.mercyhighered.org/identity.html.

Using Catherine McAuley’s image of an Irish reel, this presentation explores some of the dynamic interactions between study and service, classroom and community.  Among the changing “dance partners” addressed by the author are Catholic Intellectual Thought and the Mercy tradition; the Christian concepts of mystery and sacramentality; the values (virtues) of justice and love, praise and thanksgiving; education as an interactive grappling with questions and doubt; and the disciplines of meditation and narration.  The author also invokes philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer’s concept of understanding rising from a “fusion of horizons” as descriptive of the interplay between higher education and community engagement on behalf of student learning.

Application:  Faculty and staff members engaged in community based or service learning will find in this article a variety of approaches that may help them reflect further on the purposes and potentials of such curricular programs.  Intimated in some of these approaches are strategies for helping students realize the benefits of service learning for both their education and their personal lives.

 


Daigler, Mary Jeremy, R.S.M. Through the Windows: A History of the Work of Higher Education among the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas. Scanton, PA: University of Scranton, 2000.

This book stands alone as a study of the engagement of the Sisters of Mercy in higher education in the 20th century.  Opening with observations about the absence from educational and women’s histories of the work of religious congregations of women in higher education for women, Daigler delivers on her pledge to “shed light on the women, the institutions of higher learning, and the historical realities with which both interacted from 1905 to 1999.” (10)  Herein is a portrait of “twenty-nine colleges and universities spanning the continent, serving thousands of students, and employing complexly varied faculties and staffs” – all under the aegis of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas.  (11)  Included in this volume are brief histories of individual institutions, a look at Sister of Mercy preparation for and accomplishments in higher education, attention to Sisters of Mercy working in institutions beyond Mercy-sponsored ones, an overview of collaborative efforts and organizations among the Mercy institutions, and individual portraits of several significant Mercy leaders in the field of higher education.  Throughout, Daigler invokes her central image of windows with light streaming in and with access to a world outside as she concludes each chapter with a helpful summary.  Also of considerable interest will be the book’s several appendices and the wealth of citations which may lead readers to other engaging sources.

Application:  This book holds something – and often much – to those interested in understanding the scope and diversity of Sister of Mercy sponsored higher education.  Those with more particular interests – educational history or women’s studies or Catholic contributions to society – will also find much of value here.  While there are occasional inaccuracies related to particular Mercy institutions, this volume is unequalled in its broad, historical, and informative overview of the second largest group of U.S. colleges and universities sponsored by a religious congregation, the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas.

 


Dittmeier, Moya, and Eloise Rosenblatt, R.S.M., eds. “Proceedings of the Service-Learning and Civic Engagement Symposium.” Special issue, The MAST Journal 18, no. 2 (2008).

Derived from presentations at a CMHE-sponsored conference held at Georgian Court University (Lakewood, NJ) June 12-14, 2008, this edition of The MAST Journal provides background, rationale, ideas, examples, plans, and critiques of the pedagogy of service learning at a moment of time at Mercy-sponsored colleges and universities.  Broad articles on Mercy higher education in this edition of The MAST Journal are included individually in the CMHE Annotated Bibliography.  Other texts, primarily abstracts of the symposium’s concurrent workshops and summaries of the several poster presentations are noted below.

DeCapua, Lynn, Christine Davis, and Carol Scelza.  “Planning for Academic Excellence through Service Learning in Teacher Preparation”: 15-17.  These authors discuss best practices and offer course examples “to demonstrate how to link course content with service to enhance the academic learning of teacher candidates.”  (15)

Erickson, Kathleen, R.S.M.  “Immigration: A Spiritual Challenge to Discover Who We Are in Today’s World”: 9.  This presentation looks briefly at purposes, risks, and rewards of immersion service learning experiences, specifically at border trips.

Welsh, Rosemary, R.S.M.  “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Service Learning”: 18-19.  A site coordinator for service trips at the U.S.-Mexico border, this author offers advice on facing realistically the risks, possibilities, and outcomes that attend immersion experiences.

Abstracts: Concurrent Sessions

Braggs, Kate, and Catherine Darcy, R.S.M.  “Organizing for Justice on Mercy Campuses”: 34.

Daniels, John. “Assessing Service Learning: Servant Leadership, Catholic Social Teaching, and Student Evaluation of Teaching”: 35.

Daniels, John, and Michele Marie Schroek, R.S.M.  “The Nuts and Bolts of Service Learning”: 33.

Donnelly, Marie Michele, R.S.M., Lisa Fontenelli, Patricia Koch, and Ray Shea.  “Trusteeship as a Path to Mercy-Core Mission and Service Learning”:  38.

Gower, Joseph, Michael Gross, and Evelyn Quinn. “Integrating Academic and Student Life around the Call to Service”:  38.

Hurley, Colin. “Strengthening Civic Engagement through National Service Programs on Campus”:  34.

Lacey, Marilyn, R.S.M. “Mobilizing Mercy beyond Borders”: 37.

Lee, E. Suzanne, Wanda Manning, Pamela Klick, and Suzanne Kimble.  “Striving for Insight: Administrators, Faculty and Staff as Service Learners”: 33.

Lucas-Darby, Emma.  “Using Person-in-Environment Perspective as an Orientation Tool for Service Learning”: 35-36.

Presbey, Gail.  “Discussing Homelessness in an Introduction to Philosophy Class”: 34-35.

Watson, Callie, and Kristin Haas.  “Overview of How to Incorporate Service Learning into the Curriculum”:  37.

Poster Presentations

Chinery, Mary. “The Perils and Rewards of Integrating Service Learning into an English Department”: 43.

Daniel, Cristy.  “Weaving Self-Directed Learning Components into a Service Learning Course”: 43-44.

Elliott, Karen, and Jennifer Discher.  “Authentic Discipleship: An Integration of Civic Engagement, Relationship Building, Theological Reflection, and Social Analysis”: 41.

Haas, Kristin, and Callie Watson.  “The Reflective Participant in Service Learning”: 42.

Hage, Brenda, and Fred Croop.  “Synergism in Combining Service Learning, Scholarship, Social Change, and Career Preparation”:  40-41.

Knight, Eileen Quinn, Carolyn Majorowski, and Mariagnes Menden. “The Story of Service Learning in a Small Parochial School on the Southside of Chicago”: 42.

Mellon, John.  “Emergency Plan Advertisements for the Residents of a Pennsylvania Borough”:  39-40.

Rey, Janice.  “Service Learning: The Right Fit in Teacher Preparation”: 39.

Scelza, Carol. “Ideas for Making Service Part of Our Mission”:  45-46.

Smid, Mary Kay, and Kristin Kult. “Teaching Women to Teach Women the Importance of a Safe Sleep Environment for Infants: A Story of Reaching Out to Others”:  42-43.

Sullivan, Marnie, and Michele Marie Shroeck, R.S.M. “Making Critical and Civic Connections Clear: Service Learning in the Composition Classroom”: 44-45.

Warrington, Tracy, Arleen Nicholas, and Judith Keenan.  “Merciful Practices of a Business Program: Looking In, Reaching Out”:  41.

NOTE:  Until The MAST Journal is available on-line, individual copies of an article can be requested from the Mercy Heritage Center.  Contact the archivist Grant Gerlich at ggerlich@sistersofmercy.org.



Dwyer, Claudette, ed. The Quality of Mercy: A Festschrift in Honor of Sister Mary Josetta Butler, R.S.M., 1904-1995. Chicago: Privately published, 1996.

While this commemorative work highlights Sister Josetta Butler’s tenure as Dean and then President of Saint Xavier University (1940-1963), its tribute to this Mercy educator reaches well beyond any single institution.  Of particular note in this wider reach of this educational leader are

  1. the two chapters that focus on Sister Josetta’s interactions with the Sister Formation Movement of the mid-twentieth century: 
    1. “Architect of Sister Formation in Mercy” by Doris Gottemoeller, R.S.M.
    2. “Friendship at the Intersections” by Mary Emil Penet, I.H.M.; 
  2. a lengthy chapter – “Empowering India’s Women Religious” by Claudette Dwyer – recounting the story of the Overseas Education Program, which under Sister Josetta’s leadership engaged nearly 50 U.S. women’s colleges and universities providing scholarships and baccalaureate or master’s education to over 180 Indian sisters; and
  3. four chapters which recall Sister Josetta’s Vatican-based service to the Church through her role with the international Better World Movement: 
    1. “Building a Better World” by Berard L. Marthaler, O.F.M.(Conv.);
    2. “Nulli Secundus” by Catherine Felton, R.S.M.;
    3. “Free Spirit” by John A. Wilcox; and
    4. “Loving the Challenge” by Luis M. Dolan, C.P.

Application:  This festschrift holds historical value and interest for scholars of Catholic and Mercy education in the U.S.  It also testifies to the power of effective leadership and the ability of so-called small institutions to have large impact.  In some senses, the Overseas Education Program is service-learning writ large replete with such values as diversity and collaboration, compassion and excellence which are currently much touted but have roots stretching back for decades.